About KL

Complex challenges in society require new forms of innovation.

In order to tackle these issues, knowledge of the people directly involved is necessary. The challenge is to mobilise and utilise that knowledge in order to achieve sustainable renewal. That’s what we do.

A smart society is one that works together, one in which the knowledge, talents, experience and intuition present at all levels and in all areas is made use of to the full: a knowledge-driven society.

Our mission is to make society smarter and to empower people to learn and to renew themselves continuously. Kennisland develops solutions to the questions that arise during the transition to a knowledge-driven society, and is part of the vanguard of that process. We learn how this must be done by developing interventions, both on a commissioned basis and on our own initiative. We share the knowledge accumulated in doing so with as many people as possible, because knowledge only gains value when it is shared.

The knowledge-based society is multi-faceted, and as such we are obliged to make choices. At present our priorities lie with:

We aim for maximum impact without pursuing profit; our priority is the public interest. We do not receive structural subsidies. This means that we are independent, sharp and enterprising. We work together with government, business, knowledge institutes and social organisations that share our ambitions. We have achieved a lot since 1999, and have much more to do.

Since September 2015 we have been working – along with a large number of kindred spirits – on Spring House, the clubhouse for radical innovators. People and organisations who are inquisitive and who refuse to go with the flow work and experiment here together on the basis of a shared belief that society can be more social and sustainable. Read more

History

Kennisland was formally founded by Frans Nauta in July 1998. He met Joeri van den Steenhoven and Bartjan Jansen in early 1999. The three came together to start up Kennisland, with Jetse Sprey as the silent strength behind the scenes. The intention was that Kennisland should become a think tank capable of acting as a flywheel for the development of the knowledge-driven society in the Netherlands.

Enterprising think tank with a public mission.

The official inaugural meeting took place on 2 October 1999 in Felix Meritis in Amsterdam. A network of around 75 interested parties selected the first projects that the organisation would work on. A meeting with twenty senior figures from business and government followed in December of the same year. The Committee of Recommendation already featured many famous names. In early 2000, Kennisland began working as an organisation with its own office. The first projects were Kenniswijk (Knowledge District) and Digitale Trapvelden (Digital Playgrounds). The reputation of Kennisland as a creative club of young guns was established; the work could begin.

 

Annual reports
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Why KL

Kennisland can help you locate and support innovators, maximise knowledge development and knowledge sharing and translate expertise into practical interventions and innovation.

We are big in thought and action but small and flexible in organisation. This means that we can adapt quickly. We love to get our hands dirty: our enthusiasm and our expertise can set any organisation in motion. Our approach ensures that top down and bottom up are no longer polar opposites but instead reinforce one another.

Check our cases

It's the people who get things done.

At KL, political scientists, sociologists, social geographers, anthropologists, experts in public administration, philosophers, communications specialists and generalists work towards a smarter society. Get to know our team. Chris Sigaloff and Paul Keller are responsible for the management of KL.

Supervisory Board

The Supervisory Board supervises the organisation and advises the Board of Directors. It meets three times per year. Click here for an overview of additional posts held by members of the Board of Directors and the Supervisory Board. The current members of the Supervisory Board are:

  • Valerie Frissen
    Valerie Frissen
    Director SIDN Fund and Professor of ICT and Social Change Erasmus University Rotterdam

    She works nationally and internationally at the interface between media, technology, innovation and creativity. Image: All rights reserved

  • Annet Kil-Albersen
    Annet Kil-Albersen
    Director of Onderwijscoöperatie (Educational Cooperative)

    Has devoted her career to the improvement of education, in particular through improving the position and professionalism of teachers. Previously chairwoman of the Stichting Beroepskwaliteit Leraren (Organisation for the Professional Quality of Teachers). Image: Giorgos Gripeos (CC BY)
  • Liesbeth Bijvoet
    Liesbeth Bijvoet
    Managing director of the Jewish Historical Museum

    She is also responsible for the Portuguese Synagogue and the Hollandsche Schouwburg. She made ​​the transition from the sustainability sector to the cultural sector and has experience in both the profit and non-profit sector. Liesbeth was previously manager of operations at Premsela. Image: Giorgos Gripeos (CC BY)
  • Victor van der Chijs
    Victor van der Chijs
    Chairman of the Board of Directors of the University of Twente

    Former partner at OMA and director of Schiphol International BV. Previously employed at ING Group in the Netherlands and China. Also a member of the Dutch Trade Board, the Supervisory Board of the National Historical Museum and the Economic Development Board of Rotterdam. He is chairman of the Supervisory Board. Image: Rikkert Harink (All rights reserved)

Contact and practical information

Bank account
Rabobank
Apollolaan 153, 1077 AS Amsterdam
IBAN: NL62 RABO 0168 7809 76
Swift/BIC: RABONL2U

Chamber of commerce: 33304517
VAT: NL8079.61.395.B01

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